An incised floodplain soil. Normally dry through the profile due to drainage of the watertable, this one has been wetted up after rain.

An incised floodplain soil. Normally dry through the profile due to drainage of the watertable, this one has been wetted up after rain.

Tasty, tasty soil! Lovely, organic-rich, clay loam floodplain soil!

Tasty, tasty soil! Lovely, organic-rich, clay loam floodplain soil!

I’m not a fungi-person/mycologist, so have no idea what this is other than “a mushroom”. But it is doing a good job busting through the compacted vehicle track!

I’m not a fungi-person/mycologist, so have no idea what this is other than “a mushroom”. But it is doing a good job busting through the compacted vehicle track!

A perfect day in the field doing some hydraulic soil coring in the Central West Catchment of NSW.  Testing for total organic carbon and labile carbon amoings other things.

A perfect day in the field doing some hydraulic soil coring in the Central West Catchment of NSW.  Testing for total organic carbon and labile carbon amoings other things.

Dense till plates, White Mountain National Forest, New Hampshire, USA. Taken by Jess Philippe (@gojessgo)

Dense till plates, White Mountain National Forest, New Hampshire, USA. Taken by Jess Philippe (@gojessgo)

A developing ‘chroma’ from Bonnie’s (well matured) compost.  From centre to periphery you can see nitrogen, mineral, organic matter and humus levels with enzyme activity on the very edge and active microbes as a function of the integration of the parts (biology is mostly dormant in this one.)  From @ptpermaculture

A developing ‘chroma’ from Bonnie’s (well matured) compost.  From centre to periphery you can see nitrogen, mineral, organic matter and humus levels with enzyme activity on the very edge and active microbes as a function of the integration of the parts (biology is mostly dormant in this one.)  From @ptpermaculture

This is a soil core taken from Ginnini Flats, a sphagnum peat wetland in the high country of the ACT. The soil is really dark as it is full of charcoal and organic matter. This photo was taken during a field trip run by Geoff Cary and Geoff Hope, from the Australian National University, in the subject Fire in the Environment. From Dr Lyndsey Vivian

This is a soil core taken from Ginnini Flats, a sphagnum peat wetland in the high country of the ACT. The soil is really dark as it is full of charcoal and organic matter. This photo was taken during a field trip run by Geoff Cary and Geoff Hope, from the Australian National University, in the subject Fire in the Environment. From Dr Lyndsey Vivian

A rocky outcrop in the Tinderry Ranges, NSW, several months after a bushfire. Plants are starting to grow back in some shallow soil amongst the rocks. From Dr Lyndsey Vivian

A rocky outcrop in the Tinderry Ranges, NSW, several months after a bushfire. Plants are starting to grow back in some shallow soil amongst the rocks. From Dr Lyndsey Vivian

What species is this one Jess?  A fungus from the Jarrah woodlands of the Darling Escarpment of Western Australia. From @ptpermaculture

What species is this one Jess?  A fungus from the Jarrah woodlands of the Darling Escarpment of Western Australia. From @ptpermaculture

Spodosols from Croatan Island, North Carolina, USA

Spodosols in a pine forest on the coast of North Carolina

This picture shows soil cores of Spodosols (a USDA Soil Taxonomy soil order) near the location where the official soil description of the Leon series (sandy, siliceous, thermic Aeric Alaquod) was described on Croatan Island on the coast of North Carolina.

Spodosols form in sandy soils in pine forests where humic acids from decomposing pine straw strip iron and aluminum from the A and E horizons leaving a “bleached” E horizon. These Fe and Al laden humic acids then accumulate in Bh (histic) and/or Bs (spodic) horizons creating a brown to red-colored horizon directly underlying the E horizon.

The picture was taken during the North Carolina State University Soil Geomorphology Tour in May 2012. You can see more pictures and read about the tour at ColbyDigsSoil.com: North Carolina Soil Geomorphology Tour