Deep ‘fen peat’ floodplain soil at Flixton, Scarborough, UK.
An archaeological dig reveals the black lowland peat soil, formed by a palaeo-lake 12,000 years ago. The pale grey layer at the base of the profile is a lake bed marl from Lake Flixton, home of the famous Mesolithic site of Star Carr (www.starcarr.com). Modern land drainage has caused the peat to shrink and the land level drops. A farm wetland restoration initiative has made progress trying to re-wet parts of the floodplain for heritage and wetland wildlife, which helps protect the carbon locked up in these soils.(www.carrswetland.wordpress.com) 

Deep ‘fen peat’ floodplain soil at Flixton, Scarborough, UK.

An archaeological dig reveals the black lowland peat soil, formed by a palaeo-lake 12,000 years ago. The pale grey layer at the base of the profile is a lake bed marl from Lake Flixton, home of the famous Mesolithic site of Star Carr (www.starcarr.com). Modern land drainage has caused the peat to shrink and the land level drops. A farm wetland restoration initiative has made progress trying to re-wet parts of the floodplain for heritage and wetland wildlife, which helps protect the carbon locked up in these soils.(www.carrswetland.wordpress.com

An incised floodplain soil. Normally dry through the profile due to drainage of the watertable, this one has been wetted up after rain.

An incised floodplain soil. Normally dry through the profile due to drainage of the watertable, this one has been wetted up after rain.

Tasty, tasty soil! Lovely, organic-rich, clay loam floodplain soil!

Tasty, tasty soil! Lovely, organic-rich, clay loam floodplain soil!

A perfect day in the field doing some hydraulic soil coring in the Central West Catchment of NSW.  Testing for total organic carbon and labile carbon amoings other things.

A perfect day in the field doing some hydraulic soil coring in the Central West Catchment of NSW.  Testing for total organic carbon and labile carbon amoings other things.

serpentinitic:

Can’t believe I haven’t posted this on here yet. What I live on. Vertisols always get me going. SHRINK SWELL

What ap are you using? 

serpentinitic:

Can’t believe I haven’t posted this on here yet. What I live on. Vertisols always get me going. SHRINK SWELL

What ap are you using? 

Top 10 Reasons Why ‘I Heart #Soil’

1. That life is soil. And soil is life.  

2. It is biologically diverse. One teaspoon of soil has 1 billion bacteria living in it. 

3. Soil is beautiful. I love the different horizons, colours, clays and layers.

4. It allows us to produce food.

5. It is mysterious; there is a lot we don’t know about soil. 

6. It cleans our water. 

7. It is complex. There are many chemical, biological and physical interactions in soil.

8. Every soil is different and unique. 

9. The feel of wet soil in my hands, and its rich smell of life, reminds me of being a kid. 

10. Soil supports our daily lives by providing us with the resources we need to live.

Why do you heart soil?

Alice is determining a better way of analysing labile (the most readily available) #soil #carbon in agricultural systems. 

Alice is determining a better way of analysing labile (the most readily available) #soil #carbon in agricultural systems. 

Analysing pH on my friends veggie garden #soil. pH can tell us a lot about soil nutrients, including what is more and less likely to be readily available to plants. 

Analysing pH on my friends veggie garden #soil. pH can tell us a lot about soil nutrients, including what is more and less likely to be readily available to plants. 

Undertaking microbial biomass carbon to understand: what is the community size of the microbes in my #soil? Soil is fumigated and then extracted, filtered and the liquid is then analysed. 

Undertaking microbial biomass carbon to understand: what is the community size of the microbes in my #soil? Soil is fumigated and then extracted, filtered and the liquid is then analysed.